Cut-Resistant Gloves: Slicing Costs, Not Hands

Cut-Resistant Gloves: Slicing Costs, Not Hands

There are many workplaces today that require regular use of cut-resistant gloves.  ANSI, the American National Standards Institute, places regulations on what safety requirements need to be met.  In spite of this, there is an average of 439,000 crippling hand injuries that take place every year!  The average insurance payment cost for each of these injuries is $3,856, with average medical payments at about $2,600.  Do the math, and that’s MILLIONS of dollars in repairing damages that ought not to have happened.  Here are some quick tips to help you slice costs, rather than hands:

Every glove has its own unique characteristics unique to the materials and structure it’s composed of.  For example, steel mesh gloves tend to have a higher deflective capacity than a Kevlar or spectra fiber, but may likely sacrifice some manual dexterity.  On the other hand, the steel mesh may aid in grasping wet or slippery objects.  This is why the mesh gloves tend to be favored in the poultry and meat processing industries.  That, and you feel awesome when you wear one.

Consider on the other hand that you work in a restaurant.  A steel mesh glove is obviously not the right choice for the kitchen.  Perhaps the best choice for you would be a Kevlar, or Kevlar polymer glove.  It allows a greater degree of dexterity, while retaining a high level of cut resistance.  You could also consider using the Digiguard, which is a much simpler device that offers great protection for those who do less-frequent cutting.  It may also be wise to watch for anti-bacterial glove variants to help ensure health safety at the same time.

Be mindful of the nature of your cutting.  Most cut-resistant gloves are not rated for machinated blades and saws.  Furthermore, many gloves that have high cut-resistance may lack puncture resistance.  It’s important to choose the right glove for the job.  If the gloves are needed for a workplace in which a stab or puncture is more likely, then a glove that is designed to withstand that is recommended.  For most general purposes, however, standard cut-resistant gloves will do the job.  Check out our line of cut-resistant safety gloves and start saving money today!
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